1
a month ago
Admissions Advice

Is my SAT score good?

Hello. I have a 1470 superscore. I was just wondering if it was really necessary to raise it if I wanted to get into any Ivy or other top schools. My math score is kinda low (720), but the thing is is that I'm not going into anything STEM related whatsoever (I'd have nightmares thinking about it). From what I've been reading online, I've seen mixed commentary; some say don't worry, others say you'd have slim chances. If I were to take it again my parents would go berserk. Personally, I don't think I have to because if every admit got a score in the 50th percentile range, then that wouldn't be the range.

SAT
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4 answers

2
a month ago[edited]

Honestly, you're not providing the reader enough information to provide an informed recommendation.

Ivys and Top Elites or LACS all incorporate their version of DEI policies and Affirmative Action with regards to how they treat test scores. In addition, within the pool of admits are also recruited athletes, development candidates, VIPs, sons and daughters of employees, and legacies. These groups in the pool mislead the perceived middle test scores when applicants read the range.

So let's say you apply to UPenn because you feel your 1470 is close enough to their Class of 2025 50th Percentile range of 1500-1560. What this range doesn't tell you is the fact that there are different stats for different types of applicants. For instance, the recruited athletes coming out of Choate, Lawrenceville, Peddie School, Georgetown Prep, and St. Albans might have 1400 to 1450s. The kids of billionaires whose parents wrote checks for $20 million for a new building wing might have 1350-1400s, the legacy group might have middle scores of 1450-1500 and a few VIPS might have no scores and get a pass because they have 5 million followers on Insta. Then the BIPOC low-income marginalized students might have middle scores between 1330-1420. UPenn doesn't want people to know this but if you watch enough youtube stats videos you'll see a correlation with BIPOC low-income students and Low ACT and Low SAT scores. And on the opposite end, you'll see all the high achieving East Indian, Jewish, Asian, and preppy CIS White kids getting 1520s to perfect scores.

This wide range of applicant sub-pools in the bigger applicant pool exists in all Ivys and Elites so as long as you are aware of the, choose wisely as to whether you submit your test scores as they are or want to take the time and effort to improve them.

One thing you said is that you thought your 720 Math Score was low compared to the 750 EBRW scores. That's true because 3/4s of the students with a 1470 superstore most likely have it the other way around, 720 EBRW and 750 Math.

On the bright side, your 750 EBRW is really good and most people find that they can improve their Math score a lot easier than their English score. So if you were to even it out that would be of great benefit in my opinion.

I don't know what your college list looks like but I highly recommend that you research each school for the Class of 2025 freshman profile to see if your 1470 meets at least the 25th percentile score. That will give you a roadmap of where to apply and whether you want to take time out to improve it.

Good luck.

2
0
a month ago

I visited Northeastern recently and talked directly to people on the admissions committee. What they told me is:

1) because of COVID, you largely get a pass for standardized test scores. Great ones are a great addition to your resume, but not integral to your application like in past years. That means that your SAT score probably means less than what some others let on!

2) go through this process with all of your prospective colleges: (a) find their mid-50th percentile range of SAT scores (you can usually find this on their websites after some light digging). (b) figure out where your score places in relation to this. (c) Only report your SAT score to schools where your score places within or above that range. Any score that is within or above that 50% percentile range will help your application, great! Any score below that range will likely not help your application- you can just choose not to report it to that specific college. This does mean reporting to colleges specifically, rather than through the general section of the common app (you can find more info about the logistics of score reporting online).

be savvy with what you report and what you don't, as well as how you spend your time. The hours you spend studying or going to take another SAT could probably be better used writing a stellar essay (and from what it seems, you may be an english/arts person, so I bet that you could get a lot more benefit from extra hours for writing essays than studying for a section of the SAT that frustrates and discourages you).

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0
a month ago

What are your individual scores? Most colleges look at SAT's individually, not the superscore.

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0
a month ago

I know a guy in Harvard University with 1250 SAT score. I hope your question is answered

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