4
3 months ago
UCLA prospective students
[edited]

How can I get into UCLA? I had good grades my first semester but they fell due to a loss, do I have a chance?
Answered

My first semester I had a high weighted gpa that fell significantly in the course of a month because I lost three family members, and school became harder to focus on. I want to get into UCLA more than anything but I am afraid my grades will prevent it because they fell as I dealt with personal loss. I need advice from the school. What can I do to still make it into the school?

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GPA
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UCLA
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7
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2 answers

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Accepted Answer
3 months ago

I'm sorry for your loss Sophia. My grandfather passed last week and I can't imagine how you must feel with 3 losses.

After some research and thinking, I really don't know if you are going to be a solid candidate at UCLA. While many applicants have similar stories of hardship and loss, I can't imagine UCLA making too many exceptions. The reason I think this is the case is that this year UCLA receive 139000 applications for about 6250 spots. They will admit about 15500 like last year but the acceptance rate is going to be like 11% instead of 14%, and the yield rate will be around 40% (number of applicants admitted who matriculate).

Next year I imagine it's going to be much of the same story because more and more kids will be applying to UC schools since they are affordable compared to Privates and the entire UC system is test-optional and no longer considering SAT II Subject tests since College Board is phasing them out.

I still think you should apply during Nov.30 deadline and give it your best shot. But I have a back-up plan for you. If you can enroll in the Santa Monica College Scholars Program (SMCC is located in Santa Monica near UCLA, 8 Miles away) they have a UCLA Transfer Alliance Program which gives you preferential treatment to be considered as a transfer student after doing a year or two there. It's not the same as starting at UCLA as a freshman but if UCLA is your dream school, what matters is that you get to attend and graduate from UCLA right? No one needs to know how you got there. I'm not sure if it is a better plan than say applying to UC Davis or UC Riverside and then trying to transfer to UCLA. All I know is that the UCLA transfer rate is about 24% or twice good as the normal acceptance rate.

Here are some links you can research and make a more informed decision on a backup plan.

https://www.smc.edu/student-support/academic-support/counseling/special-support-programs/scholars/about-scholars/about.php

https://www.smc.edu/student-support/academic-support/counseling/special-support-programs/scholars/about-scholars/UCLA-transfer-alliance.php

https://admission.ucla.edu/apply/freshman/freshman-profile

https://newsroom.ucla.edu/releases/ucla-sees-surge-in-underrepresented-applicants

Good Luck.

7
1
3 months ago

I fully fully second Cameron’s answer but I want to add on a few things. With the UCs WGPA formula in state residents have an average of 4.04. If your GPA is lower than a 3.5 definitely go down Cameron’s route.

The lowest 75th percentile is a 3.75 GPA and as I don’t see any school not factoring personal circumstances that drastically affect school (loss 100% counts) so while they will definitely consider your lower GPA they will look at it in context and likely see it as a 3.75 instead of a 3.6 or something like that (not sure on exact boost).

Just make 100% sure to communicate the losses in a personal professional manner instead of a casual and or pity seeking way. Extra information section is the ideal place in my opinion.

Hope this helps and feel free to comment if you’s like clarification as I’d be more than happy to help!

Again sorry for your loss.

1

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