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27 days ago
UCLA prospective students

Transfer

Is it possible for me to transfer after first year to UCLA and what kind of school should I get into if I want to transfer?

2022
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2
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2 answers

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11 days ago[edited]

I'm applying to UCLA as a transfer student. I chose a California Community College that participated in UCLA's Transfer Alliance Program (TAP). TAP applicants get priority consideration at UCLA. There are over 70 community colleges that participate in TAP. Here's a list: https://admission.ucla.edu/apply/transfer/ucla-transfer-alliance-program

I should add that you do not need to get an Associate degree. There's two ways to pursue your gen eds. The 7 breadth coursework is recommended for students pursuing STEM majors that have a lot of courses recommended on assist.org . The IGETC is recommended for most other majors.

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27 days ago

Hi there @Ifedinachi,

It's definitely possible to transfer into UCLA after a year. You can do this by going to community college and achieving an Associate's degree in a fast-track program.

Or, you can go to a four-year-university and then apply to transfer. If you're transferring from one UC to another, it's not that simple even though they fall under the same parent university. Different UCs have different prerequisites, so you'll want to look into UCLA's prerequisites for your prospective major and craft your coursework at your original UC around that. It may be helpful to talk to a counselor who is knowledgeable about UC's credit transfer policies.

Transferring universities can be complicated, but once you have the right information, you should be able to get on the right track.

Hope this helps!

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