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Unweighted GPA: 3.7
1.0
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SAT: 720 math
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What is the CLT exam and how does it compare to the SAT and ACT?

I came across the CLT exam recently, and I'm curious about whether it's a good alternative to the SAT or ACT. How do colleges view the CLT, and does it have any specific advantages over the other two tests?

7 months ago

The CLT, or Classical Learning Test, is an alternative standardized test to the SAT and ACT, mainly designed for students from a classical or Christian education background. The CLT aims to measure critical thinking, logical reasoning, and problem-solving abilities and emphasizes classical works and ideas. It consists of three sections: Verbal Reasoning, Quantitative Reasoning, and Analytical Writing.

When it comes to college acceptance, the CLT is not as widely accepted as the SAT or ACT. Nonetheless, a growing number of colleges and universities, mainly religious or conservative institutions, are recognizing the CLT as a valid admissions test. It's essential to research the acceptance policies of the schools you're interested in before choosing the CLT over the SAT or ACT, though, as many colleges will only accept the ACT or SAT.

In terms of advantages, the CLT offers a few key benefits over the SAT/ACT. First, it's specifically designed with the classical education curriculum in mind, so students from that background may find the content and focus of the CLT more appealing. Additionally, the CLT offers more flexibility when it comes to testing locations, as it can be taken at any location with an approved proctor, which may be helpful for you if you live far from a typical testing center.

However, the limited recognition and acceptance of the CLT by colleges and universities compared to the SAT and ACT is a significant drawback. This might impact your college applications if you apply to schools that don't accept the CLT. Therefore, if you're considering taking the CLT, I recommend first thoroughly researching your target schools' test policies and acceptance rates of students who submitted CLT scores.

In conclusion, the CLT is gaining recognition as a college admissions exam but is not yet as widely accepted or known as the SAT and ACT. If you have a classical or Christian education background and are applying to colleges that accept the CLT, it might be a good alternative, especially given its unique focus, digital format, and quicker score reporting. However, if you're applying to a variety of institutions or highly selective ones, it's safer to stick with the more universally accepted SAT or ACT.

I hope this helps, and good luck with your college admissions journey!

7 months ago

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