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Has anyone pursued an undergrad law degree?

Hello, guys! I'm really interested in pursuing a career in law and was wondering if any of you have experience with pursuing an undergrad law degree. What was it like and do you think it's worth it as opposed to waiting for law school? Thanks so much!

6 months ago

Hey there! An undergraduate law degree, like a Bachelor of Laws (LL.B.), is common in countries outside the US, such as the United Kingdom, and may offer a direct path to legal practice. In the US, there is no equivalent to this degree, however—most aspiring lawyers complete a four-year degree in any major, then attend law school to receive a Juris Doctor (J.D.), and eventually take the bar exam in the state where they will be practicing.

If you're outside the US, one advantage of an undergrad law degree is the exposure to legal concepts early on, which can help you assess your interest in the subject. However, if you're planning on living in the US as an adult, be aware that the legal system you study in undergrad in a different country will be different. Some of the general concepts may translate, but you'll still have to learn the specifics of American law. Additionally, you'll still have to earn your J.D. and pass the bar in the US to practice law—an undergraduate degree isn't sufficient.

If you're in the US, or planning on living in the US long term, instead of focusing on an undergrad law degree, consider majoring in a subject that will allow you to develop the detailed analysis and critical thinking skills you'll need to thrive in a law career. Courses in political science, philosophy, and history can be especially beneficial in honing these abilities.

You can also join relevant clubs or mock trial teams to get a practical taste of the legal world, or even shoot for a summer internship in a law office. With this approach, you'll both familiarize yourself with the world of law and give yourself a broader academic foundation, so if you decide not to pursue law, your options will remain open.

In the end, whether or not to pursue an undergrad law degree depends on your location, the education system, and your long-term goals. Good luck with your legal pursuits!

6 months ago

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