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Duke University
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UCLA
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Your chancing factors
Unweighted GPA: 3.7
1.0
4.0
SAT: 720 math
200
800
| 800 verbal
200
800

Extracurriculars

Low accuracy (4 of 18 factors)

Confusion Over ACT Score Ranges

Yo, I'm a bit muddled on ACT score ranges. What are the ranges and what scores are considered good, average, and excellent?

14 days ago

Hi there, here's a general breakdown for your reference:

- The ACT is scored on a 1-36 scale, with 36 being the highest possible score.

- A score of 14 or below would be considered a low score - this is in the lower 25th percentile of test-takers.

- An average score tends to be around 20-21. This is right in the middle of the range, and approximately half of all test-takers will score above or below this number.

- A score of 24-26 is generally considered a good score, as this would put you above average.

- If you score above 28, you will be in the top 25% of test takers and this is considered an excellent score.

- And finally, a score of 33 and higher would put you in the top 1% of test takers—a remarkable achievement.

However, what is defined as a 'good' score also greatly depends on the specific colleges you're aiming for. It's a good idea to check the mid-50% ACT range for entering students at your desired schools (generally listed on the schools' admissions websites). This will give you a good idea of what score you should be aiming for when applying to those specific colleges.

Keep in mind that scores aren't everything and colleges also look at course rigor, GPA, essays, recommendations, extracurriculars, and more. Nonetheless, a higher ACT score can definitely work in your favor and help you stand out. Happy studying!

14 days ago

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