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Will children of African immigrants be compared to other children of African immigrants?
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I notice that, on Collegevine, my odds increase when I include the fact that I am black. However, my parents did not come to the United States until the 1990s. Children of African immigrants typically perform better than blacks with long familial ties to the United States. Do African applicants face challenges similar (even if not as difficult) to those of Asian applicants? (Asian applicants are first compared to other Asians.)

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I would like to start off by saying that I am not an expert in the college admissions process, I am just a senior who has recently been through the process. At the end of the day colleges are just looking to maintain a diverse student body within their student body. Sometimes the way in which they achieve this diversity can be deemed questionable, but I am not going to get into that discussion. It is most likely that when trying to maintain diversity they are not going to look beyond what race you list. It unlikely that they would even know that your parents immigrated to the US unless they got college degrees in their native country. I think that you are looking too deeply into the odds generator than you necessarily need to be. From my experience it was not the most accurate in terms of where I got in and where I didn't.