back to questions

No AP or IB classes

1
vote
,

I don't live in the US, and in my country there is no such thing as AP or IB classes. do i have a chance to be accepted into ivy league schools even if i don't take them? are there any online i can take?

IB
AP

2 answers

answered on
0
votes

Colleges will typically look at your classes in context with what is offered at your high school (or equivalent in your country's education system). So as long as you're taking the most difficult or rigorous courses available to you, you should have a chance. That said, it is typically harder for international students to get into schools like the Ivies than it is for American students, unless you can pay full price.

I believe you can also take AP tests independently and in my opinion Ivies are overrated when other top schools like George tech UCal U-Wisc Madison among others are great schools beating them in some aspects they have a higher chance at admittance while still having a superb education. A school Im interested in a public engineering school and 12hr drive away In midwest USA is better than MIT and Harvard for engineering. And their dean says only 500! non state applicants even apply there.
[edited]
Online APs might be good in a pinch but they won't be regarded the same as taking in-school AP classes. And it depends on what you're studying and what you want to get out of college. If you're someone with significant financial need, Ivies are going to be a lot cheaper (with need-based aid) than basically any other private universities or out-of-state public universities, so they can be way better for low-income students than schools like GTech and Wisconsin.
I'm not sure what school you're talking about—but I kind of doubt that a school that only draws 500 out-of-state applicants is "better" than MIT for engineering. Otherwise, why doesn't it draw more applicants? Schools like UIUC, Wisconsin, Georga Tech, etc. are all basically on the same level as schools like MIT, Stanford, Cornell, etc. when it comes to academic caliber for eng. You'll be around similar people, similar professors; there really isn't much of a difference between them in the end
Missouri S&T one ranking I saw had them third with MIT in 5th I believe
Ah I see—I just looked through those rankings (College Factual, right?) and it seems like they really emphasize the number of other students at that school studying that major, and how closely related every other major at that school is to it. So that's going to heavily favor small schools that focus in a very narrow, specialized manner on engineering—so it makes sense why Mines, Missouri S&T, and Rose-Hulman rank so highly there compared to other rankings.
Whether or not that's a good metric to use, it depends. I think there's a lot of value in having a diverse student body focused on a lot of different subjects—you learn more that way, and usually exit with a more diverse array of skills. But if you want to be super narrowly focused on something, those rankings are probably a good bellwether to use. Bottom-line, it's good to read rationales and understand why a particular ranking system is the way it is rather than just throw comparisons around.
[edited]
Also to emphasize the point I made earlier about price, Missouri S&T would be about ~$43,000 for OOS students. If someone's family makes less than ~$175k/yr, MIT's need-based aid would typically make it cheaper than that. Ivies might be "overrated" in that they're not wildly academically better than other top schools, but considering the median US family makes about $63k/yr (at which point most Ivies are *free*), they'll usually be a lot cheaper than anything besides in-state public schools.
answered on
0
votes

There are some AP classes that you can take online. I am taking AP Government and Civics online.