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a month ago
Admissions Advice

Hey I gave the Sat this August and I got a 1450. 710 EBRW and a 740 Maths. Should I submit this to Ivy League schools?
Answered

I want to major in engineering

1450
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Accepted Answer
a month ago[edited]

There are 8 Ivy League schools and they all have different SAT ranges for admits. If you use the middle 50% as a guideline for whether to submit or not, meaning admit scores for the 25%th to 75%th Percentile, only 4 schools satisfy this, Cornell, Dartmouth, Princeton, and Brown which are like 1420-1460 for the 25th percentile 2 cycles ago. The Common Data Set for last year's admissions rates are not out yet but I suspect the SAT scores went up because only those who had good SAT scores submitted them. So if Princeton was at 1460/1560 2 cycles ago, then perhaps last year it was 1470/1570 something like that.

At UPenn, Columbia, Harvard, Yale all are in the 1500-1560 range for middle SAT scores so I wouldn't submit a 1450 to those schools unless you are a.) BIPOC (person of color), b.) low income, c.) identify as belonging to a marginalized group (for instance an Int'l LGBTQIA HS student or having a physical disability or belong to a persecuted population for religious reasons).

Since all the Ivys are test-optional, submitting a lower SAT or ACT score doesn't really help your application. But submitting a good SAT score in line with their previous admits often improves your chances of getting admitted. In general, about 2/3rd to 3/4s of applicants did submit test scores to Ivys in spite of their test-optional policies so keep that in mind as well.

Good luck.

2
0
a month ago

yes

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