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How does demonstrated interest work?
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,

On that note, what does the new demonstrated interest tab in CV do?

early-decision
applications

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Accepted answer

So I don’t what you are talking about regarding the D I tab on collegevine but demonstrated interest is in a phrase interactions with a college/university.

Schools want applicants to enroll there (yield rate) and by interacting with the school it shows you are interested and thus more likely to enroll. You can interact with them via school visits webinars signing up for the news letter emailing AOs following on insta etc.

Most (not all) prestigious schools care about DI quite a bit with the notable exception of most of not all of the ivies as they already know that they are the best (ivies are ivies for a reason).

DI will not auto disqualify you but would be useful in a tiebreaker. Refer to Common Data set (google common data set insert school) there’s gonna be a table in the pdf that shows how much the institution values interest.

Hope this helps please comment if you need clarification as I’d be happy to clarify!

[edited]
They're talking about a new feature under the schools drop down on CV.
Thanks @cp839! For some reason my eyes just skipped over it.
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Hi there! Thanks for your question! Demonstrated interest is an important part of the admissions process for many universities as they choose their final class from a large pool of qualified applicants (see here: https://blog.collegevine.com/what-is-demonstrated-interest-in-college-admissions/).

Because COVID-19 has disrupted normal campus visits (a traditional mechanism for demonstrating interest), CollegeVine is partnering with universities to let students "signal" to their top choice schools. To maintain the power of the signal, each student is allowed only 5 signals. Using a signal just tells the school that you're strongly considering them, as you used one of your scarce signals on them.

Hope this helps!

Also to know a bit more about yield rates google collegevine tufts syndrome. I found that very informative.