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10 days ago
Admissions Advice

Will my daughter who studied 11th grade in the US get admissions for 12th grade in India?

She did her schooling till 10th in India (cbse) and came to the US for 11th (came as dependents due to my husband’s job). But due to personal reasons we are planning to go back to India. Is it a good idea to go for 12th grade there since most of the syllabus would already be covered and might have boards if we join cbse or icse? And also they might need different course loads since they need to choose a stream for 11th and 12th, the courses she took in 11th was easier here in the US and didn’t take much courses in the stream. Do you think they'll give admissions for her?

It’s really hard to decide and your views will be appreciated. Thank you

12thgradeclasses
india
USA
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1 answer

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10 days ago[edited]

Short Answer: It depends.

Long Answer:

Usually, universities prefer students to stay in the same school for a long time for commitment purposes if possible. However, this is definitely not a decisive factor. I will mention, though, that according to what I've heard, it is ideal to stay in the same school for 2 years in a row.

Here are some examples of various families' decisions that I've seen:

My family decided to stay in the same year for as long as possible (12 years), and not move at all no matter the situation, even though we contemplated on moving to Australia, Canada, or the US for better opportunities.

One of my senpais (upper classmen) had to switch schools every two months. Her father was a professional basketball player, which was why they needed to move to various countries often. She ended up writing about it in her application and was accepted into various universities in the US.

One of my closest friends had to move back to Canada after 11th grade (this year). Because of that, instead of only taking high school there for one year (in 12th grade), they decided to drop a grade and be in the same grade as their younger sister, who is 11 months younger than them. That way, they could be in the same school for two years. Instead of applying in 2025, they decided to apply in 2026.

So in conclusion, I'd say:

1. Stay as long as possible in the same school if possible.

2. If you have a very dire situation, make sure to mention it somewhere in your application about your circumstances.

3. Ideally, stay in the same school for at least 2 years; if not, look at the point above. Otherwise, universities might be suspicious as to why you're moving around so frequently.

4. Consider the possibility of moving down a grade to reflect on yourself and improve your grades. Especially considering that your daughter is in 11th grade right now, if her grades in 9th aren't exactly the best and can be improved much better, this is definitely an option.

5. Just remember that it is ultimately your choice to decide what is best. I have simply just listed some examples I have encountered.

(Edit: I just realized that you're just simply wondering if your daughter will be accepted into a school in India for her 12th-grade year. As for that, since I'm not sure about India's school system, so I cannot say anything. All my points are just simply what to consider for applications into US universities).

Hope this helps,

SilverDragon (11th/rising 12th, Class of 2025, Japan)

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