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10 months ago
Admissions Advice

Good colleges for Bachelor of Science in Architectural studies?

I took Phy, Chem, Maths all my high school and had a recent realization that I wanted to study in this field

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2 answers

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10 months ago

The most reliable list of Undergraduate Rankings for Architectural programs is from the Trade Publication AR (Arch. Record)

https://www.architecturalrecord.com/articles/14289-americas-top-architecture-schools-2020

There are 3 ways to become an Architect in America.

1.) Go to an Accredited 5 year accelerated B.Architecture program like the schools on this list. Then you intern for 3 years, take your NCARB registration exam and if you pass all 6 exams over a 2 or 3 day sitting, you are an architect. If you don't pass a section you can take that section over.

https://www.ncarb.org/pass-the-are

2.) Go to a B.S. Architecture 4-degree program, graduate and then apply into a 2-year M.Arch program for a total of 6 years, be an intern for 3 years and then sit for your NCARB exam.

3.) Go to any 4-year non-architecture program like a liberal arts college etc, then apply into an M.Architecture 3.5-year program such as the ones offered by Columbia U, Harvard, or Yale, MIT, etc. These IVYS and MIT do not have an undergrad program that leads to a degree that allows you to sit for the NCARB exam, only graduate school.

If you go straight into a 5-year program, you will start taking Architectural classes right away. These are super intense programs. My dad went to Syracuse U and although the admit rate for the school is 45%, it's about 10% for the architecture school. Cornell has the same 10% admit rate as most likely Rice, Cooper U, and RISD about 15%. When he attended the Freshman class was about 105-110 by the 5th year only 38 graduated. There is severe burnout because the studio classes are very misleading with the time commitment. You have to take about 54-60 hours of studio design over the 5 years or about 6 credits per semester. While a standard liberal arts class is 3 credits for 3 lecture hours, the 6 credit studio class is 12 hours of mandatory studio time 3 times a week plus about 20-30 hours per week of homework. So you are spending 30-40 hours a week in 1 class for 5 years. Then you need to take 4 other classes sometimes 5 to meet the graduation requirements. Here is a link to the curriculum for SU.

https://soa.syr.edu/live/files/437-barch-curriculum-fall-2019-or-later

Therefore, unless you are 100% certain you are ready to commit to 5 years of brutal coursework, sometimes it's better to take the slower path 4+2, or 4+3.5, and enjoy your time as a college student. If you want to end up with a Prestigious degree from MIT, Harvard, Yale, then you are best to take the slower route. I don't have a list of 4 year B.S. Arch programs but you can research those on your own. They would include schools like Ball State, USC, Univ Minnesota, UVA, Univ. of Kansas, Univ of Maryland.

1 Cornell University

2 Rhode Island School of Design

3 Rice University

4 Cooper Union

5 Syracuse University

6 Virginia Tech

7 Pratt Institute

8 California Polytechnic State University, San Luis Obispo

9 University of Texas, Austin

10 Southern California Institute of Architecture (SCI-Arc)

Undergrad Ranking over the past 10 years.

2020 19' 18' 17' 16' 15' 14' 13' 12'

Cornell U 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 1

R.I.S.D. 2 6 10 7 6 7 10 7 6

Rice Uni 3 2 6 4 5 3 3 3 5

Cooper U 4 5 15 12 14 13 - 16 14

Syracuse Uni 5 4 3 3 4 5 6 3 7

V Tech 6 8 4 5 3 4 5 7 3

Pratt 7 7 9 8 11 9 11 11 10

Cal Poly SLO 8 3 2 2 2 2 1 5 4

UTAustin 9 10 7 6 7 6 4 6 2

SCI-Arc 10 9 8 10 12 8 9 2 7

Good luck. There are a lot of resources and research you can do.

Best of all, talk to an architect in person.

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10 months ago

Cornell has the best architecture program in the USA and MIT and Harvard's are very good as well.

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