1
5 months ago
Admissions Advice

The new Columbia question asks about household size. What should I do if my parents are divorced?
Answered

At my mom's house there are four of us, but at my Dad's there are six! What should I put on my application?

supplemental
Question
Columbia
application
commonapp
1
5
🎉 First post
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[🎤 AUTHOR]@zoe5 months ago

Thank you so much for answering quickly!

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2 answers

-1
Accepted Answer
5 months ago[edited]

So I have a slightly different answer than Cameron’s.

You’d put the person who you spend the most time with. For example, if you have the traditional arrangement of being with your dad every other weekend and a weeknight you’d put your mom's house size.

Where I differ from Cameron is that if your parents split custody equally you’d likely use the person who is the biggest financial contributor. I’m basing this off of the FAFSA requirements. I'm not certain how this is decided but I believe it has to do with income or maybe income per household. I’m also fairly certain that any step-parents you have would factor into the biggest financial contributor.

To be completely honest this is my best guess and I'd reach out to Columbia directly.

Really hope this helps and feel free to comment if you’s like clarification as I’d be more than happy to help!

Edited for grammar.

-1
6
5 months ago

I would put the household of the custodial parent. So if that is your mom, then 4. If that is your dad, then 6.

If neither parent is the custodial parent then you would put down 9 or 10 because I'm not sure if you are supposed to double count yourself. (There are 9 unique individuals correct not 10).

I hope that helps.

Good luck.

6

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